I Am Half Sick of Shadows

3,187 notes

asylum-art:

Tom Bagshaw:Fantastical illustrations

on Facebook, on Behance, (tom bagshaw) on deviantART

Tom Bagshaw lives Bath, England, and works as a commercial illustrator. His personal work explore fantastical and mystic themes. The intricate style of painting he adopts sets it apart from his commerical portfolio.

‘Feminine beauty plays a large role in my work,’ he says, ‘but they are never frail damsels in distress. More often than not they’re strong, intriguing characters, with an air of mystery to them.’

Bagshaw strikes a balanced tone by embellishing the dark and ghoulish elements with quirky and absurd details. For his commercial illustration he works under the pseudonym Mostlywanted. His clients include Saatchi & Saatchi, Sony, BBC, Kraft, GQ, Scholastic, and Random House.

(via opheliaimmorta1)

Filed under art women feminism mythology

179,920 notes

Being born a woman is an awful tragedy. Yes, my consuming desire to mingle with road crews, sailors and soldiers, bar room regulars—to be a part of a scene, anonymous, listening, recording—all is spoiled by the fact that I am a girl, a female always in danger of assault and battery. My consuming interest in men and their lives is often misconstrued as a desire to seduce them, or as an invitation to intimacy. Yet, God, I want to talk to everybody I can as deeply as I can. I want to be able to sleep in an open field, to travel west, to walk freely at night.

Sylvia Plath

fuck every single time that last line gets quoted without the rest

(via sex-positive-bitches)

(Source: raccoonwounds, via realtrai)

Filed under poetry sylvia plath women feminism quote

621 notes


mythology meme:  [3/8] myths, legends, and stories
↳ the kidnapping of iðunn

This particular story is from the Prose Edda; more specifically, it’s found in the book Skáldskaparmál (‘language of poetry’), which is presented in the form of a dialogue between Ægir, a sea giant, and Bragi, the god of poetry.
One day, Loki the trickster is trying to chase a large eagle away with a pole, but after whacking it, he gets stuck to the bird and is carried higher and higher into the sky. Loki begs the eagle, who is actually the ice giant Þjazi in disguise, to release him. Þjazi does so, on the condition that Loki will lure Iðunn, the goddess of youth, out of the gates of Asgard so that Þjazi can kidnap her. Loki agrees and later fulfils his promise by telling Iðunn that there are interesting apples in a certain forest, and that she should want to bring her own with to compare. Intrigued, Iðunn goes with him, and eagle-shaped Þjazi snatches the goddess between his claws and flies away.
The Æsir start to wither and grow old without Iðunn’s youth apples and they figure Loki has something to do with her disappearance. The Æsir tell him he has to bring her back, or there’ll be dire consequences. Loki gets Freyja to lend him her ‘falcon shape’, and off he goes. He finds Iðunn and turns her into a nut to carry her back home. However, Þjazi notices his prisoner has gone missing, and chases the disguised Loki. The Æsir notice the two birds coming from afar and they build a large fire by the walls of Asgard; the falcon manages to evade the fire, but the eagle is unable to stop and flies straight into the flames. 

mythology meme:  [3/8] myths, legends, and stories

↳ the kidnapping of iðunn

This particular story is from the Prose Edda; more specifically, it’s found in the book Skáldskaparmál (‘language of poetry’), which is presented in the form of a dialogue between Ægir, a sea giant, and Bragi, the god of poetry.

One day, Loki the trickster is trying to chase a large eagle away with a pole, but after whacking it, he gets stuck to the bird and is carried higher and higher into the sky. Loki begs the eagle, who is actually the ice giant Þjazi in disguise, to release him. Þjazi does so, on the condition that Loki will lure Iðunn, the goddess of youth, out of the gates of Asgard so that Þjazi can kidnap her. Loki agrees and later fulfils his promise by telling Iðunn that there are interesting apples in a certain forest, and that she should want to bring her own with to compare. Intrigued, Iðunn goes with him, and eagle-shaped Þjazi snatches the goddess between his claws and flies away.

The Æsir start to wither and grow old without Iðunn’s youth apples and they figure Loki has something to do with her disappearance. The Æsir tell him he has to bring her back, or there’ll be dire consequences. Loki gets Freyja to lend him her ‘falcon shape’, and off he goes. He finds Iðunn and turns her into a nut to carry her back home. However, Þjazi notices his prisoner has gone missing, and chases the disguised Loki. The Æsir notice the two birds coming from afar and they build a large fire by the walls of Asgard; the falcon manages to evade the fire, but the eagle is unable to stop and flies straight into the flames. 

(via enigmaticrose)

Filed under mythology

160,949 notes

Entitled

Me:
This older generation pisses me off so much
Therapist:
Why?
Me:
Because when I was growing up, we were forcefed the idea that if we didn't want to be 'flipping burgers at McDonalds,' then we'd better go to college.
Therapist:
And?
Me:
And now we've all gone to college, have degrees, can't get a damn job, and the same people that told us to go to college call us entitled assholes because we refuse to flip burgers
Therapist:
Touche

Filed under quote kids today